Joint Ownership Options Could Help Keep Austinites In Their Homes

By Bill Oakey – February 24, 2016

One of the biggest problems facing longtime Austin residents is the high cost of property taxes. In recent years we have seen skyrocketing property appraisals that are literally pricing people out of their homes. Neighborhoods across that city that were once affordable are constantly seeing older homes bulldozed and replaced by very expensive luxury housing. This cycle of resident displacement and gentrification is difficult to overcome. Many of the affordable housing options being discussed by City officials consist of fee waivers to developers or geographic tax abatements that ultimately end up shifting the costs to other taxpayers. There are no easy solutions.

Joint Home Ownership Might Help Solve the Problem

Relatives and friends can legally enter into agreements that allow them to share ownership in a home. For example, you could ask a wealthy uncle to buy a 40% stake in your home. One simple way to do that would be for him to put up 40% of the equity that you have have in the home. Then from that point forward, you would pay 60% of the monthly mortgage bill and he would pay 40%. You would also share a 60/40 split on other expenses such as insurance and property taxes. And you would split the Federal income tax mortgage interest deduction. Neither one of you could sell the home without the other’s agreement, but you could sell your interest in the home. If the home is eventually sold, you and your uncle would do a 60/40 split on the proceeds.

Of course, not all of us has a relative or a trusted friend who would be interested in becoming a joint owner of our home. Perhaps the City of Austin should explore new and innovative ways to make joint ownership available for people who find themselves in danger of losing their homes. Right now, you as a homeowner cannot call up your mortgage lender and offer to sell an interest in your home to that lender. There is not a real estate office that you can call and ask to list a percentage of your home for sale on the open market. But if systems like that could be put in place, it might help a lot people be able to afford to stay in their homes.

High housing costs and property taxes also make it difficult for renters to be able to buy a home. Since the end of the recession, the rate of home ownership in the U.S. has declined. Tighter lending standards and student loan debt have made a harder for first-time buyers to get a home loan. CNBC recently published an article entitled, Is a Single-Family Home the New Luxury Item? The same could be asked about condos and townhouses, especially in Austin. A joint ownership option could help reduce the barriers to first-time homebuyers, including the down payment.

I would like for our City officials to consider this idea and discuss it with members of the real estate community. Joint home ownership is legal in Texas, but expanding it to real estate brokers and mortgage lenders could require changes to state or Federal laws. It seems like it would be a boost to the economy and quite helpful to many Austin residents. Many of us might be willing to give up a portion of the investment in their home for an opportunity to enjoy a lower burden of expenses.

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One thought on “Joint Ownership Options Could Help Keep Austinites In Their Homes

  1. Dick Brown

    Bill – have you checked into the council’s decision to divert $106 million from Austin Water and
    use the money to buy 650 residential lots in the Pilot Knob MUD (located outside the city), and de facto GIVE the lots to moderate income persons who are not residents of Austin and who in fact will live in a separate jurisdiction?

    Reply

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